Matt Heusser & Chris Kenst – Contributing to GitHub is for Everyone

 

GitHub, the world’s largest social coding platform, seems ideally suited for developers (and that’s how it’s advertised). Companies and recruiters already know this and increasingly look for GitHub references to evaluate prospective candidates. Testers can take advantage of this by joining and using Github for personal and professional projects.

Companies are increasingly going to GitHub to evaluate candidates. That’s great news for coders, but less-great for testers, especially testers who think of themselves as … well … less technical. Yet you can set up a GitHub account and begin contributing to open source by the end of an hour — even if it’s just bug reports.

Anyone who attends this session can learn about Git version control, GitHub, repositories, merging, pushing, committing, and where to go for more.

GitHub is relatively new and very interesting. Major companies who commit to open source and many more who don’t, host their private and public projects at GitHub because it offers an easy way to version control their software as well as access to built in bug tracking and public wikis. This means there’s a lot of programs and code sitting on GitHub waiting for someone skilled in the craft of software testing to come along and help them improve their quality.

Testers can have a big impact here and in doing so practice their testing and bug reporting skills, get familiar with git (version control), GitHub (as a platform) and add to their public portfolio of work.

Take-aways:

1. Get set up with a GitHub account

2. By the end of the 30 minutes, select a project to contribute to and know how

3. Learn enough about forking, pushing, merging and committing to update READMEs, help docs, and other types of text files – including the full git workflow

4. You’ll be able to check in key test artifacts right alongside the code, as a first-class, versioned and branched document

*Co-presented by Matt Heusser and Chris Kenst

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